HIPPOTHERAPY AND ERGOTHERAPY IN CHILDREN

Hippotherapy (Horse treated therapy) is the therapy method for the support of assistance to help physical, cognitive, sensory, emotional, and social difficulties living in people.


Ergotherapy practices in children with autism, attention deficiency, hyperactivity, development voltage, learning figuring, down syndrome, behavior problem, and cerebral palsy; require the requirements of children and requirements necessary to evaluate the evaluation of the needs of children. Ergotherapists carry out the work of children, cognitive, sensory, development of social stakes, social participation, parent-child play sharing, and daily living activities. The fact that these studies are conducted in an environment where the horse lives with horse support outside the clinical, home, and school environment makes a difference to the child's learning.


Hippotherapy covers not only the work done on the horse, but also the environment in which the horse lives, participation in the care of the horse, and applications in processes such as horse nutrition. And these environments contain a lot of sensory richness for children, visual, auditory, tactile, physical.


Hippotherapy applications provide sensory feedback using horse movements, and thanks to this feature, these applications are used in different neurological situations (1). In ergotherapy applications in hippotherapy, horse movements are used to improve performance in motor control, coordination, balance, attention, sensory processing processes in daily activities (2,3,4).


In addition, children try to adapt themselves to constant oscillations to try to stand upright on a horse and understand where the center of gravity is, and this activates the vestibular system (balance, movement). Ups, downs, oscillations, the force of each step, the pressure from the saddle allows the child to receive different sensory inputs during hippotherapy.


Having a large number of different tactile inputs in the natural environment, such as the texture of the horse, the skin of the saddle, is valuable for children's sensory processes. The sounds the horse makes in different situations, the sounds in the environment give children the opportunity to experience different auditory inputs.


Children with special needs experience difficulties with sensory integration, such as difficulty tolerating sensory stimuli, difficulty controlling their movements, and discomfort with some tissues. For example, for a child diagnosed with autism with sensory pursuits that constantly jump, swing, push and pull, the horse's movements can be regulatory and give it the input it needs. As a result of a study in the literature, parents of children diagnosed with autism who were included in the hippotherapy program noted that significant improvements were observed in their children's physical, social, and sensory functions. In the same study, a positive effect of hippotherapy on problematic behavior was determined. (5)
Horses are our most valuable teammates in the therapy process. To ensure maximum development in the studies conducted, the intimate and natural interaction established with the horse is very important.

Author: Cemre Sağlam - Ergotherapist
Volunteer Translator: Büşra Turan

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Resources:
1. Muñoz-Lasa S, Ferriero G, Valero R, Gomez-Muñiz F, Rabini A, Varela E. Effect of therapeutic horseback riding on balance and gait of people with multiple sclerosis. G Ital Med Lav Ergon. 2011; 33:462–7. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
2. Silkwood-Sherer DJ, Killian CB, Long TM, Martin KS. Hippotherapy--an intervention to habilitate balance deficits in children with movement disorders: a clinical trial. Phys Ther. 2012; 92:707–17. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
3. Champagne D, Dugas C. Improving gross motor function and postural control with hippotherapy in children with Down syndrome: case reports. Physiother Theory Pract. 2010; 26:564–71. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
4. Debuse D, Chandler C, Gibb C. An exploration of German and British physiotherapists’ views on the effects of hippotherapy and their measurement. Physiother Theory Pract. 2005; 21:219–42. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
5. Muslu GK, Conk H. Animal-Assisted Interventions and Their Practice in Children. Duehyo ED. 2011; 4:83–8. [Google Scholar]
https://thesensorytoolbox.com/hippotherapy-how-horses-can-help-with-sensory-integration/

 

Hippotherapy (Horse treated therapy) is the therapy method for the support of assistance to help physical, cognitive, sensory, emotional, and social difficulties living in people.


Ergotherapy practices in children with autism, attention deficiency, hyperactivity, development voltage, learning figuring, down syndrome, behavior problem, and cerebral palsy; require the requirements of children and requirements necessary to evaluate the evaluation of the needs of children. Ergotherapists carry out the work of children, cognitive, sensory, development of social stakes, social participation, parent-child play sharing, and daily living activities. The fact that these studies are conducted in an environment where the horse lives with horse support outside the clinical, home, and school environment makes a difference to the child's learning.


Hippotherapy covers not only the work done on the horse, but also the environment in which the horse lives, participation in the care of the horse, and applications in processes such as horse nutrition. And these environments contain a lot of sensory richness for children, visual, auditory, tactile, physical.


Hippotherapy applications provide sensory feedback using horse movements, and thanks to this feature, these applications are used in different neurological situations. (1) In ergotherapy applications in hippotherapy, horse movements are used to improve performance in motor control, coordination, balance, attention, sensory processing processes in daily activities. (2,3,4)


In addition, children try to adapt themselves to constant oscillations to try to stand upright on a horse and understand where the center of gravity is, and this activates the vestibular system (balance, movement). Ups, downs, oscillations, the force of each step, the pressure from the saddle allows the child to receive different sensory inputs during hippotherapy.


Having a large number of different tactile (tactile) inputs in the natural environment, such as the texture of the horse, the skin of the saddle, is valuable for children's sensory processes. The sounds the horse makes in different situations, the sounds in the environment give children the opportunity to experience different auditory inputs.


Children with special needs experience difficulties with sensory integration, such as difficulty tolerating sensory stimuli, difficulty controlling their movements, and discomfort with some tissues. For example, for a child diagnosed with autism with sensory pursuits that constantly jump, swing, push and pull, the horse's movements can be regulatory and give it the input it needs. As a result of a study in the literature, parents of children diagnosed with autism who were included in the hippotherapy program noted that significant improvements were observed in their children's physical, social and sensory functions. In the same study, a positive effect of hippotherapy on problematic behavior was determined. (5)
Horses are our most valuable teammates in the therapy process. To ensure maximum development in the studies conducted, the intimate and natural interaction established with the horse is very important.

Author: Cemre SAĞLAM - Ergotherapist
Volunteer Translator: Büşra TURAN

.

.

.

Resources
1. Muñoz-Lasa S, Ferriero G, Valero R, Gomez-Muñiz F, Rabini A, Varela E. Effect of therapeutic horseback riding on balance and gait of people with multiple sclerosis. G Ital Med Lav Ergon. 2011;33:462–7. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
2. Silkwood-Sherer DJ, Killian CB, Long TM, Martin KS. Hippotherapy--an intervention to habilitate balance deficits in children with movement disorders: a clinical trial. Phys Ther. 2012;92:707–17. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
3. Champagne D, Dugas C. Improving gross motor function and postural control with hippotherapy in children with Down syndrome:case reports. Physiother Theory Pract. 2010;26:564–71. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
4. Debuse D, Chandler C, Gibb C. An exploration of German and British physiotherapists’ views on the effects of hippotherapy and their measurement. Physiother Theory Pract. 2005;21:219–42. [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
5.Muslu GK, Conk H. Animal-Assisted Interventions and Their Practice in Children. Duehyo ED. 2011;4:83–8. [Google Scholar]
https://thesensorytoolbox.com/hippotherapy-how-horses-can-help-with-sensory-integration/

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